International Cancer Imaging Society


Our Journal - Cancer Imaging

Our Journal 1
Our Journal 1

 

Cancer Imaging is the official journal of ICIS, an open access, peer-reviewed journal published by BioMed Central. Original articles, as well as reviews and editorials written by international imaging experts with a subspecialty focus on oncology, are published regularly online;  sign up for alerts to keep up-to-date with the latest articles.

Cancer Imaging Impact factor is 2.404.

The journal encompasses CT, MRI, ultrasound, single photon and positron emission tomography, including multimodality imaging in all kinds of malignant tumours, plus new developments, techniques and innovations.

All articles published in Cancer Imaging are included in PubMed, the most widely used biomedical bibliographic database service, as well as Embase, EmCare, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, Science Citation Index and Scopus. The full text of all research articles is deposited in PubMed Central, the US National Library of Medicine's full-text repository of life science literature.

ICIS Members receive 20% discount on article-processing fees.

Submit your next manuscript to Cancer Imaging and take full advantage of the following:


Members Area


Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format

Medical Imaging News -- ScienceDaily

Most patients with unknown spinal cord disease later given specific diagnosis, study shows

Published: Tue, 09 Jan 2018 12:46:49 EST

A study found that most patients with suspected spinal cord inflammation of unknown cause have an alternative, specific diagnosis.

Prolonged periods of sedentary time strongly associated with amount of fat around internal organs

Published: Tue, 09 Jan 2018 09:18:02 EST

Researchers have found new evidence to suggest that longer periods of sedentary time (defined as any sitting/reclining activity with low energy expenditure) are more strongly associated with the amount of fat deposited around internal organs.

Novel PET tracer clearly identifies and tracks bacterial infection in lungs

Published: Mon, 08 Jan 2018 10:58:15 EST

Researchers have demonstrated that a new radiotracer, 2-18F-fluorodeoxysorbitol (18F-FDS), can identify and track bacterial infection in lungs better than current imaging methods and is able to differentiate bacterial infection from inflammation.

Next-generation medical scanning

Published: Fri, 05 Jan 2018 14:24:56 EST

Researchers have developed a new way to magnetise molecules found naturally in the human body, paving the way for a new generation of low-cost magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology that would transform our ability to diagnose and treat diseases including cancer, diabetes and dementia.

Advances in brain imaging settle debate over spread of key protein in Alzheimer's

Published: Fri, 05 Jan 2018 08:23:19 EST

Recent advances in brain imaging have enabled scientists to show for the first time that a key protein which causes nerve cell death spreads throughout the brain in Alzheimer's disease -- and hence that blocking its spread may prevent the disease from taking hold.

Advanced MRI can detect placental perfusion abnormalities in pregnancies complicated by fetal CHD

Published: Thu, 04 Jan 2018 16:08:22 EST

In pregnancies complicated by fetal congenital heart disease, global placental perfusion was significantly decreased and regional variation of placental perfusion significantly increased as pregnancies progressed, findings that point to non-invasive imaging providing an early warning of placental dysfunction.

Milestone' for new noninvasive heart test medicare now covers FFR-CTcoronary artery test

Published: Thu, 04 Jan 2018 12:42:58 EST

On Jan. 1, Medicare began covering a new noninvasive test for heart disease called FFR-CT. "Medicare coverage is a major milestone," said Loyola Medicine cardiologist Mark Rabbat, MD. "Millions of Americans now can potentially benefit from this game-changing technology."

Bright and stable: New acid-tolerant green fluorescent protein for bioimaging

Published: Thu, 04 Jan 2018 12:03:23 EST

Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for visualization of molecular and cellular processes; however, most FPs lose fluorescence at a pH lower than their neutral pKa (~6). A team of researchers developed the acid-tolerant green FP -- termed Gamillus -- cloned from flower hat jellyfish. Gamillus exhibits excellent brightness, maturation speed, and photostablity, even in low pH environments, making it a feasible molecular tag for imaging in acidic organelles.

Scientists design bacteria to reflect 'sonar' signals for ultrasound imaging

Published: Wed, 03 Jan 2018 13:27:40 EST

Scientists have designed bacteria to reflect sound waves like submarines. The technology could eventually allow doctors to image therapeutic bacteria in the body using ultrasound.

Tailoring cancer treatments to individual patients

Published: Wed, 03 Jan 2018 12:30:54 EST

Researchers have developed computer models to predict how cancer will progress in a specific individual, based on tissue, cellular and subcellular protein signaling responses. The models can predict how brain tumors (gliomas) will grow with much greater accuracy than previous models. Recently, the group began a clinical study to predict how an individual's cancer will progress after one cycle of therapy, and to use that prediction to plan the course of treatment.

Corporate Sponsors

Guerbet
Siemens

ICIS would like to acknowledge the generous support of our Corporate Sponsors.

News

07 October 2017

Congratulations to our 2017 prize winners!

Congratulations to our 2017 prize winners!

ICIS Gold Medal 2017

We are delighted that Prof. Anwar Padhani from Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Mount Vernon Cancer Centre in the UK has received this prestigious awa ...
» Read more » Other news items