International Cancer Imaging Society Development Site

International Cancer Imaging Society Meeting and 18th Annual Teaching Course

  Advancing Cancer Imaging:   

  Improving Patient Outcomes  

Sun 07 Oct 2018 - Tue 09 Oct 2018

Palais de l’Europe, Menton, France

Meeting President: Prof. Wim Oyen, London, UK

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» Register Here  

» Submit an Abstract - Deadline 5th June 

Interactive Workshops

These one day teaching courses are limited to 20 participants, each with their own imaging workstation and content delivered through lectures and hands-on case based learning.

Courses in 2018

Masterclass in Imaging of Gynaecological Cancer, London, Thu 01 Nov

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Other Courses in 2018

Masterclass in Imaging of Oncological Whole Body MRI, London, Thu 08 Nov

If you would like to be kept updated about our courses please scroll down and register your interest in the turquoise box at the bottom of the homepage.

Join our Society

Do you believe that Cancer Imaging is important?

If your answer is yes, join us to support and promote the education in oncological imaging and stimulate research in the study of human tumour behaviour.

As a member you will also receive:

  • Discounted registration fees for all our teaching courses
  • Exclusive access to the members' area
  • Exclusive access to posters and presentations from the annual teaching course
  • 20% off the APC for submitting manuscripts to Cancer Imaging

» Join now 

About ICIS

The International Cancer Imaging Society exists to meet the important challenges of advancing imaging in the multidisciplinary management of cancer.

We promote education in oncological imaging and stimulate research in the study of human tumour behaviour, bringing together radiologists with an interest in oncological imaging for the exchange of ideas, and to organise scientific meetings, multicentre research studies and postgraduate courses within the field.

 

» Latest News 

Cancer Imaging Journal

Impact Factor 2.404

Cancer Imaging is the official journal of ICIS, it is an open access, peer-reviewed journal with original articles as well as reviews and editorials.  The journal encompasses CT, MRI, ultrasound, single photon and positron emission tomography, including multimodality imaging in all kinds of malignant tumours, plus new developments, techniques and innovations.

Great cases and speakers, a superb course. Thank you, good facilities and great food. Friendly faculty.

RM | Dumfries and Galloway, UK

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Please click on the link below to register your interest for future ICIS interactive courses.  We will notify you in advance of registration opening, allowing you first refusal on our popular courses.

To register your interest, fill in the details below and click on the "Register Interest" button.




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Medical Imaging News -- ScienceDaily

New tissue-imaging technology could enable real-time diagnostics, map cancer progression

Published: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 12:59:38 EDT

A new microscope system can image living tissue in real time and in molecular detail, without any chemicals or dyes. It enables researchers to study concurrent processes within cells and tissue, and could give cancer researchers a new tool for tracking tumor progression and physicians new technology for tissue pathology and diagnostics.

Having a meal activates the functioning of human brown fat

Published: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 09:47:24 EDT

The importance of the human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become clearer during the past ten years. Using positron emission tomography, PET, it was shown that adult humans have functional BAT. Coldness is an effective activator of the BAT metabolic function but, in rodents, eating has the same effect. Now, researchers have shown that having a meal increases oxygen consumption in human BAT as much as coldness.

RFK's assassination: A medical analysis of his injuries and neurosurgical care

Published: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 12:30:56 EDT

Although much has been written about Robert F. Kennedy's assassination, to date there has been no detailed medical discussion of Kennedy's injuries and treatment. A new article addresses this subject.

'Smart stent' detects narrowing of arteries

Published: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 12:30:00 EDT

Researchers have developed a type of 'smart stent' that monitors even subtle changes in the flow of blood through the artery, detecting the narrowing in its earliest stages and making early diagnosis and treatment possible.

World's first intra-operative MRI-guided robot for bilateral stereotactic neurosurgery

Published: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 12:25:17 EDT

Scientists have recently designed the first neurosurgical robotic system capable of performing bilateral stereotactic neurosurgery inside a magnetic resonance imaging ('MRI') scanner.

Laser-sonic scanner aims to replace mammograms for finding breast cancer

Published: Mon, 18 Jun 2018 10:26:45 EDT

For women over 40, mammography is a necessary yet annoying procedure to endure every year or two. The technique, while valuable for reducing breast cancer deaths, is less than ideal because it exposes patients to X-ray radiation and requires their breasts to be painfully squished between plates. The plates flatten the breast so the X-rays can more easily pass through it and produce a clear image.

New 3D imaging analysis technique could lead to improved arthritis treatment

Published: Mon, 18 Jun 2018 10:26:08 EDT

An algorithm to monitor the joints of patients with arthritis, which could change the way that the severity of the condition is assessed, has been developed by a team of engineers, physicians and radiologists.

New nuclear medicine method shows promise for better detection of neuroendocrine tumors

Published: Wed, 06 Jun 2018 12:04:19 EDT

Researchers have shown that a new nuclear medicine procedure could safely and more effectively detect cancerous gastrointestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors than current methods.

Cancer: Microbubbles delivered via gas embolotherapy could cut off blood supply and deliver drugs

Published: Tue, 05 Jun 2018 15:41:25 EDT

Embolization -- the use of various techniques to cut off the blood vessels that feed tissue growth -- has gained traction over the past decades to treat cancerous tumors, and one specific version is gas embolotherapy. During this process, the blood supply is cut off using acoustic droplet vaporization, which uses microscopic gas bubbles induced by exposure to ultrasonic waves. Researchers have discovered that these bubbles could also be used as potential drug delivery systems.

What effect does transcranial magnetic stimulation have on the brain?

Published: Tue, 05 Jun 2018 10:35:11 EDT

Researchers have gained new insights on the question of how transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) effects functional interconnectivity of neurons. For visualization, they employed fluorescent dyes which provide information on the activity of neurons by light. Using this technique, they showed in an animal model that TMS predisposes neuronal connections in the visual cortex of the brain for processes of reorganization.

More breast cancers found with combined digital screening

Published: Tue, 05 Jun 2018 10:34:52 EDT

A combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis detects 90 percent more breast cancers than digital mammography alone, according to a new study.

Novel PET imaging noninvasively pinpoints colitis inflammation

Published: Mon, 04 Jun 2018 12:49:25 EDT

A novel positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method shows promise for noninvasively pinpointing sites of inflammation in people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

In MS, disintegrating brain lesions may indicate the disease is getting worse

Published: Mon, 04 Jun 2018 11:24:41 EDT

For decades, clinicians treating multiple sclerosis (MS) have interpreted the appearance of new or expanding brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans as a sign that a patient's disease is getting worse. Now researchers are finding that it may be the atrophy or disappearance of these lesions into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that is a better indicator of who will develop disability.

Novel microscopy technique developed to analyze cellular focal adhesion dynamics

Published: Fri, 01 Jun 2018 13:47:23 EDT

Researchers have developed a new form of microscopy that allows them to observe the formation and evolution of cell membrane focal adhesions.

Now, you can hold a copy of your brain in the palm of your hand

Published: Wed, 30 May 2018 11:32:14 EDT

Medical imaging technologies like MRI and CT scans produce high-resolution images as a series of 'slices,' making them an obvious complement to 3D printers, which also print in slices. However, the process of manually 'thresholding' medical scans to define objects to be printed is prohibitively expensive and time-consuming. A new method converts medical data into dithered bitmaps, allowing custom 3D-printed models of patient data to be printed in a fraction of the time.

Researchers magnify the brain in motion with every heartbeat

Published: Tue, 29 May 2018 14:09:33 EDT

A new imaging technique provides a promising and long-awaited diagnostic tool for spotting concussions and other brain injuries before they become life threatening.

Virtual brain could aid surgical planning

Published: Tue, 29 May 2018 13:21:17 EDT

Researchers have simulated neural activity based on the unique structural architecture of individual brain tumor patients using a platform called The Virtual Brain. The findings are a first step toward creating personalized brain models that could be used to predict the effects of tumors and consequent surgery on brain function.

Combination pack battles cancer

Published: Tue, 29 May 2018 13:20:29 EDT

For efficient cancer therapy with few side effects, the active drug should selectively attain high concentration in the tumor. Scientists have introduced a new approach, in which two synergistic drug components are combined into a dimer. This dimer can be incorporated into polymeric nanotransporters at exceptionally high concentration. The components are activated when the dimer is split within the tumor. In addition, they enable use of two different imaging techniques.

Fetal MRI can reliably spot holoprosencephaly as early as 18 gestational weeks

Published: Mon, 21 May 2018 13:15:39 EDT

Fetal magnetic resonance imaging can reliably spot holoprosencephaly as early as 18 gestational weeks, providing an opportunity to counsel families earlier in their pregnancy, according to new research.

Nanoparticles derived from tea leaves destroy lung cancer cells: Quantum dots have great potential

Published: Mon, 21 May 2018 09:27:20 EDT

Nanoparticles derived from tea leaves inhibit the growth of lung cancer cells, destroying up to 80 percent of them, new research has shown. The team made the discovery while they were testing out a new method of producing a type of nanoparticle called quantum dots. These are tiny particles which measure less than 10 nanometers. A human hair is 40,000 nanometers thick.